SPIL: How are we doing?

Results of State Plan objectives as of September 30, 2014

Our State Plan for Independent Living for the three years ending September 30, 2016 is in effect. In addition, the law authorizing the federal Independent Living programs was reauthorized in 2014, after 16 years. The newly amended law provides for some changes that will be incorporated into our programs.

Centers for Independent Living, WCILC, ILCW, DVR and our other partners work hard to make Wisconsin a better place for people with disabilities to live independently. We will be updating these results of our 2014-16 state plan objectives.

A. Inclusive Communities

A1 People with disabilities access coordinated, integrated, affordable, accessible, transportation options as shown by an increase to five counties that coordinate non-emergency medical transportation with other transportation programs that serve PwD.

A2 People with disabilities access coordinated, integrated, affordable, accessible, transportation options as shown by 95% of Transportation Coordination Councils (TCCs) with at least one person with a disability (PwD).

A3 People with disabilities access accessible, affordable, integrated and safe housing as shown by 60 organizations promoting Visitability standards.

B. Economic Stability

B1 People with disabilities access work incentives benefits consultation as shown by 8 ILCs serving at least the greater of 90% of the number of consultations in 2013 or 50 consumer consultations with consumers better able to understand how working impacts their benefits.
Results

B2 People with disabilities have meaningful choice regarding assistive technology for work after assessment and consultation by professionals independent from vendors as shown by 8 ILCs serving at least 95% of consumers served in 2013 with consumers better able to understand their AT options.

C. Community Living Supports

C1 Consumers access individual supports that allow them to participate in all aspects of our communities as shown by 54 counties that offer Comprehensive Community Services (CCS).
Results

C2 Consumers access individual supports that allow them to participate in all aspects of our communities as shown by 90% of people in LTC system who report meeting outcomes related to community living.

C3 People with disabilities have meaningful choice regarding assistive technology for community living after assessment and consultation by professionals independent from vendors as shown by 8 ILCs serving at least 95% of consumers served in 2013 with consumers better able to understand their AT options.

D. Empowerment

D1 200 youth with disabilities develop leadership skills, to include training and education on disability-related civil rights and their enforcement, as shown by the number of youth with disabilities reporting learning leadership skills.

D2 Consumers advocate for needs through a grassroots network with a statewide presence as shown by at least three grassroots advocates, not including staff, serving in a leadership capacity at each IL Center.
Results

E. Network of Centers

E1 Consumers access to IL Services, including:

E2 Consumers access quality IL services as shown by consumers at all eight IL Centers meeting at least 75% of IL Goals set and completed in a reporting year.

Outreach

The SPIL identifies the populations to be designated for targeted outreach efforts, identifies the geographic areas (i.e., communities) in which the targeted populations reside and describes how the needs of individuals with significant disabilities from minority group backgrounds will be addressed.

Local Outreach

IL Centers have the primary responsibility for outreach to these groups. Centers and other providers should consider strategies for outreach that include the following.

Statewide Outreach

At the state level, we identify best outreach strategies within the IL community state-wide and nationally and provide training and technical assistance to centers with respect to the various strategies and practices in identifying underserved groups and planning to meet their needs.
ILCW and the DSU have made a commitment to diversity. We show this commitment by our efforts to recruit individuals from all areas of the State, with all types of disabilities and from all significant minority populations within the State and support them for membership on the council and staff. We support nomination and recommendation to the governor for the Sec. 121 SILC representatives directly from the Sec. 121 agencies in the State of Wisconsin as is the practice with appointment of the IL network representative to the council. Work groups and committees identify potential minority organizations and/or members, consistently provide materials in alternate formats, and accomplish activities in an accessible setting that meet standards of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended.

Rev. Feb. 2015